Data Visualizations

Components and visualizations are essential for every application. Our elements offer an incredibly straightforward way to create, interact with, and modify the application - meaning you won't have to spend hours coding individual components. Instead, with ready-to-use pre-built KPIs and two- and three-dimensional visualizations, users will spend time concentrating more on their app's functionality rather than worrying about the details of each element.

Here are some visualizations and examples of when to use them:

  1. Bar Chart: Used to compare values across categories. For example, a bar chart could compare sales by product category.
  2. Line Chart: Used to show trends over time. For example, a line chart could display website traffic over a month.
  3. Scatter Plot: Used to show the relationship between two variables. For example, a scatter plot could establish the relationship between a student's high school GPA and college entrance exam score.
  4. Pie Chart: Used to show proportions or percentages of a whole. For example, a pie chart could show the breakdown of marketing expenses by channel.
  5. Donut Chart: Shows progress towards a goal or target. For example, a gauge chart could indicate progress toward a fundraising goal.
  6. Bubble Chart: Used to show the relationship between three variables. For example, a bubble chart could establish the relationship between a company's revenue, profit, and number of employees.
  7. TreeMap: Used to show hierarchical data. For example, a TreeMap could indicate a company's organizational structure, with each hierarchy level represented by a different color.
  8. Packed Bubble Chart: Used to show the relationship between three variables hierarchically. Similar to a bubble chart, but with bubbles filled tightly together to represent sub-categories. For example, a filled bubble chart could show the breakdown of expenses within different company departments.
  9. Column Chart: Similar to a bar chart, but with vertical bars instead of horizontal ones. They compare values across categories, just like a bar chart. For example, a column chart could show the monthly revenue for different products.
  10. Stacked Bar Chart: Similar to a bar chart, but with bars stacked on each other instead of side by side. Used to show how different components contribute to a whole. For example, a stacked bar chart could be used to show the breakdown of expenses for a project, with other bars representing different expense categories and the height of each bar representing the total expense.

These are just a few visualizations that can be used in a dashboard. The key is to choose the correct visualization for your data and purpose and present it clearly and easily.